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Retrieve Your Stolen Content and/or Get Recognition For It

TAMPA, FLORIDA—When you place content on the Internet, the odds of it getting stolen are stacked against you. If this is something that doesn’t sit well with you, you’re in luck because we can help you get it back.

In a previous article we offered tips and tools for protecting your content with the warning that there is no tried and true method for protecting it, aside from keeping it off the Internet altogether. Since website optimization and providing quality content are the best ways to reach potential clients and essentially grow your business, that’s probably not an option.

tips about stolen content

“Google places high value on quality sharing,” says Ali Husayni, CEO of Millionairium. “Producing quality content for our blog, as well as our clients’ blogs, is one of the main reasons we have been able to become one of the top SEO companies in the world. The growth we have achieved is through quality work that not even the best SEO software can reproduce.”

When content is placed on your website first, Google gives you the credit for it. But sometimes, there are disreputable websites that take content that isn’t theirs and because of their site’s popularity, they end up getting credit for it.

“Not all sharing is bad,” says Lorrie Walker, one of our writers who is experienced in publishing content online. “In fact, when others share your content properly they earn you popularity-boosting backlinks.”

How aggravating would it be to sit back and watch someone’s popularity grow because readers of your stolen content are sharing it and unknowingly earning them – the thieves – back-links?

You should be the one who gets the credit and reaps the benefits of your content being shared – not a thief. But first, let’s talk about methods and tools you can use to identify if your content has been stolen.

Use a search engine – You can simply take a phrase from your content – make sure you put it in quotes – and perform a Google search. If your content shows up somewhere other than your own site, it may have been stolen. Don’t jump the gun though, it’s possible that someone shared it and gave you proper credit. You can also do the same for your images using a Google image search.

Copyscape – This online service allows you to search for content that is the same or similar to yours using the URL it originated from. Copyscape’s premium service can be set up to run automatic, daily searches for stolen content or to protect you from purchasing stolen content. You can also add a banner to your content that warns thieves it is protected by Copyscape.

CopyrightSpot This service works like Copyscape. You simply use the URL to a webpage or blog feed that contains your work and it locates copies of it.

TinEye – Similar to Copyscape, TinEye scans for stolen images. It can even identify stolen images that have been edited. It’s more time-consuming, but you can also search for the subject of your image – “wild horses,” for example – and sift through the results for your original image.

Review incoming links – Many bloggers will link to the source of the content they share or in the case of a thief, steal. If you consistently check all of your incoming links you may find one that leads to a case of copyright infringement.

Google Alerts – You can use the title of your content/blog – in quotes, of course – and set an alert schedule where Google will alert you of URLs where your content is being posted.

Once you have identified that your content has indeed been stolen, we suggest using the following steps suggested by Lorelle VanFossen to get it back or get you the credit you deserve:

Contact the blogger – Remain professional and give them a chance to make things right – not everyone steals content intentionally. Ask them to remove it, rewrite it with linked excerpts, credit the material to you and your website specifically, or to compensate you monetarily for an amount you feel is fair. Be sure to give them a specific amount of time to meet your request before you take further action. Maintain a paper trail, which will come in handy for the next steps. If you can’t find their contact information, you can use a Whois Lookup or try Googling them.

Initiate a cease and desist order – Once the time you allotted for the thief to meet your request has passed, it is time to initiate legal action with a cease and desist order. This should not only be sent to the blogger, but all parties that may be unknowingly involved – including advertisers and the blog’s server host. Here you will find free downloads as well as additional information regarding the use of a cease and desist order.

Involve other parties – If several days pass without response to your cease and desist, you should contact the businesses that advertise on the violator’s blog. The majority of advertisers want to do business with reputable clients and by providing them with the evidence of the blogger’s infringement and a paper trail proving their negligence in taking action, the advertisers should react quickly. You may even be able to use a site popularity checker tool to prove to them that your stolen blog led to an unjustified increase in traffic of the thief’s blog that should have been tied to you. As a bonus they may have access to more information than you do and can contact the thief or host server directly.

Bring in the big guns – Thanks to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, search engines are willing to assist you by banning the blog from its search results once they have received adequate evidence of the blogger’s dishonesty – another reason why we can’t stress enough the importance of a good paper trail.

We hope that if you are faced with the problem of stolen content, you can use this article to take a proactive stance against the thieves.

Retrieve Your Stolen Content and/or Get Recognition For It was last modified: September 17th, 2018 by mr_million
14 thoughts on “Retrieve Your Stolen Content and/or Get Recognition For It
  1. Anonymous says:

    I want to thank you for the efforts you have put in composing this blog post. I am hoping to see the same top-quality blog posts from you in the future as well. In fact your creative writing abilities have inspired me to get my own blog now. Truly blogging is spreading its wings rapidly. Your write up is a good example of that.

  2. Anonymous says:

    I want to thank you for the effort you have put into composing this blog post. I am hoping for the same top-quality blog posts from you in the future as well. In fact your creative writing abilities have inspired me to get my own blog now. Truly blogging is spreading its wings rapidly. Your write-up is a good example of it.

  3. Barbara Cagle says:

    @best seo articles: Of course. We like to hear that that any tips/info we provide will reach an even greater audience, especially when it\’s shared properly.

    @ Kevin Ross and Sweet Nath: Thanks, glad you like it.

    @Sudarto: There is no sense behind theft, the thief simply means to take credit for unique content that was not their own, and in the SEO world – reap the ranking benefits associated with it. In my opinion plagiarism is mimicking someones use of language/idea or though WITHOUT giving them credit for it while content theft is simply stealing the content which could be written or an image and, again, not giving the author credit. If you quote something without giving it proper credit, whether it is an idea, sentence or image, it\’s theft.

  4. Barbara Cagle says:

    @Sudarto
    There is no sense behind theft, the thief simply means to take credit for unique content that was not their own, and in the SEO world – reap the ranking benefits associated with it. In my opinion plagiarism is mimicking someones use of language/idea or though WITHOUT giving them credit for it while content theft is simply stealing the content which could be written or an image and, again, not giving the author credit. If you quote something without giving it proper credit, whether it is an idea, sentence or image, it’s theft.

    @best seo articles
    Of course. We like to hear that that any tips/info we provide will reach an even greater audience, especially when it’s shared properly.

    @Swet Nath Thanks, Glad you like it.
    @Jule Hill Thanks.
    @Kevin Ross 😉

  5. Jule Hill says:

    Wow, great work Barbara. I really appraise your approach to this article and it shows how badly it affects companies\’ status in the market if they use stolen contents.

  6. Swet Nath says:

    Wow, amazing techniques. Thanks a lot. Yes. Its very important to check our stolen content. If we d0 not recognize stolen content than it will became very harmful for us.

  7. Barbara Cagle says:

    @Nicole Lee Thanks:)

    @Assassination of JFK I tried to highlight practices that would be not only easy to execute, but effective for our fellow \”non criminal\” bloggers and SEO professionals.

    @it outsourcing Thank you. Take care as well.

  8. Barbara Cagle says:

    @Keith D Mains
    Couldn\’t agree more!

  9. Barbara Cagle says:

    Thanks Jes. It\’s unfortunate that so many businesses fall victim to \”cookie cutter\” website content. Not only does it make what they do seem generic but, as you mentioned, has an ill effect on an SEO campaign when it comes to ranking well on popular search engines. @Jes Slaydon

  10. best seo articles says:

    Do you mind if I quote a few of your articles as long as I provide credit and sources back
    to your site? My blog is in the very same area of interest as yours and my users would genuinely benefit from
    a lot of the information you provide here. Please let me know if
    this alright with you. Regards!

  11. Kevin Ross says:

    The process mentioned here in order to get back or to save the unique content is very useful. Some different types of tips have been mentioned for retrieving the data.

  12. Sudarto says:

    I really hate theft, including stealing the content from our blog / website. This action is very harmful to others. There is a special ethics for writing the article when quoting other people\’s opinions. But I want to ask, what is the sense of stealing content? How much can quoting someone\’s article be regarded as theft? What is the difference between plagiarism and content theft? Thank you for the article.

  13. Keith D Mains says:

    Nice read and nice to know Ali is like minded to my way of thinking saying \”The growth we have achieved is through quality work that not even the best SEO software can reproduce\” as software is also as guilty of ripping off content as human users.

    Scraper sites that take content and use it against a site IMHO ought to be dealt with as much as human violators as they are equally irritating.

  14. Jes Slaydon says:

    Great article Barbara! At a previous job I was working on website updates – I Googled a portion to find more info and found out their entire site was copied from someone else\’s. I was so disappointed. No wonder their keyword ranking was thumbs down. 🙂

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